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Archive for the ‘Film’ Category

A CAMP (f/ Nina Persson of the Cardigans) LIVE tonight – with HD Video!

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Wow, you know, every once in a while, things really just turn out pretty awesome, like this performance from A Camp that will air tonight on Sound and Safe.  Four perfectly-rendered pop songs - including a cover of Eddie Noack's weird and wonderful "Psycho" - done by my favorite singer in the world, Nina Persson, with husband Nathan Larson (of Shudder to Think) on bass, and Niclas Frisk (of Atomic Swing) on guitar.

We got some really nice HD video of the songs - check out a preview here, for the song "Love Has Left the Room." 

Thanks very much to Tim Smith and Jacqueline Castel for shooting the video.

Tune in tonight to hear all four songs and to see all four videos.  Also keep an eye on the Free Music Archive for MP3s of the set.

A Camp kicks off a North American tour at Bowery Ballroom tomorrow night.  Their new album Colonia is out now.

Written by Trent

May 25th, 2009 at 8:30 am

ISSUE Project Room’s 6th Anniversary Party

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Holymountainissuecollage2On May 19th, Brooklyn's excellent non-profit performance space, ISSUE Project Room, will be celebrating their 6th year of kicking ass and taking names in the experimental music, film, literature, and art scenes (and also on the Free Music Archive).

The 6th birthday party/benefit for ISSUE Project Room takes place at Galapagos in Dumbo Brooklyn (16 Main St), and WFMU's own Fabio will be representing on the ones and twos. Other notable highlights on the bill include:

- The Pinch of the Baboon (JG Thirlwell, Ed Pastorini, Oren Bloedow and Ben Perowsky)

- Elysian Fields

- Mountains

- members of Excepter

- “Straight and Narrow” (1970), Film screening by Tony Conrad with soundtrack by John Cale and Terry Riley

- Robot Movie by Jim Sharpe with Soundtrack by Lary Seven


On top of this, IPR will reward a prize to the person who shows up in the best Holy Mountain-inspired costume, so you know there's potential for this party to be way better than Halloween. Purchase tickets here, and you'll get $10 off if you use the promotional code fidelio - have fun!

Written by Liz Berg

May 11th, 2009 at 12:00 pm

Dorks, Blue-Tang, Mr Wonka, Sprocket Man, and Awkward Families

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My "Awesome Internet Images" folder has been filling up lately thanks to these sites.

Designer Logan Walters loves him some Wu Tang, but hates him some Wu Tang album cover art. And so he dipped into the history of Blue Note and is working on remaking all the Wu Tang albums in that legendary style. (Via Animal New York)

EnterTheWuTang MethodMan_Tical ODB_36Chambers

Another nice design project is Spacesick's "I Can Read Movies" series in which 70s book covers meet classic geeky films.

ICanReadMovies_MrWonka  ICanReadMovies_Ghostbusters ICanReadMovies_War Games

The University of Nebraska library offers up an online archive of government produced comic books. This includes everyone from Charlie Brown to Captain America to Wonder Woman and Superman pitching various public service announcements. But it's the lesser known projects that really grabbed my interest: WISHES & RAINBOWS, a trippy kids story from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston; THE STORY OF BANKS, in which a group of hippie teens learn how to use a bank; the EC style drug scare comics HOOKED and TEEN-AGE BOOBY TRAP; and the truly lame superheroes SPROCKET MAN (he rides a ten-speed and carries a giant gear shift) and RAY CYCLE: RECYCLING SUPERHERO (he's from Connecticut). (via Slog)

SprocketMan AmphetamineUse Stagflation

If you like to make fun of your childhood self for loving computers, Star Wars, and all things nerdy, you can put your own photos up for all to see on Dork Yearbook.

DorkYearbook_Floppy DorkYearbook_StarWarsRoom

More embarrassing than an airing of your kiddie laundry is the world of Awkward Family Photos. Take a break from Mother's Day and see what some truly uncomfortable family situations are like via the site that kicks the Olan Mills love up a notch.

2002-family-picture1  AwkwardFamily_Preggers

The best one of all is NSFW, and therefore, after the jump....

AwkwardFamily_NudeFuzzys



Written by Clinton McClung

May 10th, 2009 at 7:37 pm

Never to Take a Burt Reynolds Bitchslap Again

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Written by Brian Turner

May 5th, 2009 at 12:47 pm

Even Dwarfs Started Small (1971)

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After years of only marginal interest on my part (plus a few more years of the DVD kicking around in my Netflix queue) I finally got around to watching Werner Herzog's Even Dwarfs Started Small. I'm an enthusiastic Herzog fan and have seen many of his films and enjoyed them tremendously, but for some reason the notion of this one had never been terribly compelling to me. An "uncompromising allegory about the consequences of imprisonment and rebellion" and a "powerful statement about the repercussions of ostracism," as the Netflix sleeve tries to convince me? Perhaps. And perhaps my hero just wanted to show little people parading around with a live monkey tied to a cross. Los Olvidados shot from waist high. Visions of a "profound nightmare." Acknowledged, Herzog did take very good care of his actors.

In the commentary on the DVD, he says that he "fear(s) chickens because they are so stupid." The word "gloom" also comes up a lot, which, when he says it, sounds like "gluume." Herzog also says, "It's not that the midgets are monstrous, and that was a misunderstanding" ... "Some of the fiercest opposition ... was from the dogmatic left, which believed that this film depicted, was somehow, ridiculing and depicting the world revolution, which was failing, and was ending in destruction and catastrophes." Watching Even Dwarfs... with the director's commentary track rolling turned out to be the least ambivalence-producing experience for me, as it often happens that I find Herzog the lunatic, Herzog the creative force of nature, to be even more interesting than his films. Either way, Even Dwarfs... is filled with some arresting and beautifully photographed images. If you've visited my full-time Web home, My Castle of Quiet, you know that I appreciate a good DVD screen capture—so here are a few of my favorites from EDSS:

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-16 EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-17

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-15

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-3

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-11

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-6







Written by WmMBerger

May 5th, 2009 at 8:58 am

Even Dwarfs Started Small (1971)

without comments

After years of only marginal interest on my part (plus a few more years of the DVD kicking around in my Netflix queue) I finally got around to watching Werner Herzog's Even Dwarfs Started Small. I'm an enthusiastic Herzog fan and have seen many of his films and enjoyed them tremendously, but for some reason the notion of this one had never been terribly compelling to me. An "uncompromising allegory about the consequences of imprisonment and rebellion" and a "powerful statement about the repercussions of ostracism," as the Netflix sleeve tries to convince me? Perhaps. And perhaps my hero just wanted to show little people parading around with a live monkey tied to a cross. Los Olvidados shot from waist high. Visions of a "profound nightmare." Acknowledged, Herzog did take very good care of his actors.

In the commentary on the DVD, he says that he "fear(s) chickens because they are so stupid." The word "gloom" also comes up a lot, which, when he says it, sounds like "gluume." Herzog also says, "It's not that the midgets are monstrous, and that was a misunderstanding" ... "Some of the fiercest opposition ... was from the dogmatic left, which believed that this film depicted, was somehow, ridiculing and depicting the world revolution, which was failing, and was ending in destruction and catastrophes." Watching Even Dwarfs... with the director's commentary track rolling turned out to be the least ambivalence-producing experience for me, as it often happens that I find Herzog the lunatic, Herzog the creative force of nature, to be even more interesting than his films. Either way, Even Dwarfs... is filled with some arresting and beautifully photographed images. If you've visited my full-time Web home, My Castle of Quiet, you know that I appreciate a good DVD screen capture—so here are a few of my favorites from EDSS:

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-16 EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-17

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-15

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-3

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-11

EVEN_DWARFS_STARTED_SMALL-6







Written by WmMBerger

May 5th, 2009 at 8:58 am

Brown Paper Packages Tied Up with String

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OandR Observe and Report. Dr. Colby has a way of rating movies on a scale of 0 to 12.5 dollars (because that's how much a movie ticket costs in Manhattan), and on that scale I give Observe and Report $25 because I liked it so much I saw it twice. The first time I went with DJ Kelly, and the nice ticket lady gave us tickets to Obsessed by mistake because she just could not believe that a couple of dames like us, out by ourselves on a Friday night, were there to see a dark, violent, completely incorrect comedy. (Which might describe Obsessed too, I guess, except that in that case it wouldn't be intentional.) On our way out of the theater, DJ Kelly stopped, considered carefully, and then said, "That was the most fucked-up thing I've ever seen." And she liked O&R.

So then I went to see it again with Sluggo, and he liked it too.

I'm not recommending this movie to anyone, though, because I can see how other people might not like it. Dr. Colby herself went to see it because I said it was good, and at first she gave it $2, but then she started adding a a little more here and there, like an extra $1 for the portrayal of the alcoholic mother, and she ended up giving it about $8 in the end. Still not a ringing endorsement. And if you're the sort of person who bursts into tears when someone says, like, "hospital clown" or something, you should not see it at all. But if you're curious about how a typical summer raunch-fest movie could strip away all the cliches and get down to the brutal rock-bottom awfulness of people's lives--and still be hilarious--this is the film for you. It's definitely the film for me--it might be my new favorite film ever.

Monk The Nytpicker. It's not Lies of Our Times, but it's short and funny and free. And a couple of days ago they figured out that New York Times is an anagram for Write, Monkey. (I put the comma in because it bothers me too much to leave it out.) It's at www.nytpick.com.

Swedes The Local—Sweden's News in English. I check out The Local whenever I can remember not to keep calling it The State. (I don't know why I do that.) I finally bookmarked it so it doesn't matter what I think it's called. Swedish news is pretty warped. Last year there was a happy article about all the shop-window Christmas displays that featured penises. And without their sports reporting, I would have been completely unaware of the fact that Sweden had a fantastic come-from-behind, sudden-death OT  6-5 victory over the U.S. in the World Ice Hockey Championships last week. In fact, I wouldn't have even known the World Ice Hockey Championships were happening, unless the U.S. had won, in which case it would have been on the front page of, like, the New York Times. And then Nytpicker would have found something wrong with it.  www.thelocal.se

Guam Numismaticism Update: The Guam quarter is out! Although I haven't seen one yet. But it features both the latte and the flying proa! And the Martin Van Buren gold-colored dollar is out, too, but, um ... you know. No flying proa there.

Thanks for reading my blogpost this time, and may God bless.

Written by The Iowa Firecracker

May 4th, 2009 at 5:28 pm

a spy i know

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Draft_lens2210888module11895604photo_1223243954boris-and-natasha-badanov      My brother-in-law lives abroad, and he works for the US government.  We joke and say he's a spy, but we know he isn't much like James Bond or Jason Bourne.  If he is a spy, wow, the life of a spy is pretty flat out boring.  He is a regular old American, not one of those ex-pat types who actually relishes life abroad with all of its exotic flavor. So when he visits on this side of the pond, we frequently talk about the methods he employs to maintain the American life from afar.

     If one computerized business has changed the lives of Americans everywhere, my brother-in-law the not so official spy claims, it is Amazon. Since there aren't many books published in English on other continents this ranks high on the 21st century improvement scale.  I countered with a lobby for Netflix.  Short of living atop the now defunct original NYC Kim's video, my life would have never been so filled with a broader collection of idiosyncratic and international film viewings. I know in the eyes of a pure cinephile I am seeing them in a compromised version, but I - unlike Angela Lansbury - do not have a personal stage and cinema in my house. (I heard this little tidbit from my husband who back in the day saw a hardcore show in her old house in Montclair.)

    On the menu this week, courtesy of the US Mail, I saw the furthest reaches of the rental spectrum: "The Lady and the Highwayman" (truly low brow historical novel pulp starring a very young and toothy Hugh Grant) followed by Nicholas Roeg's " The Man Who Fell to Earth" and ended finally with (by my 8 year old's request): "Mary Poppins".  While Netflix is apparently worried about competition from $1 supermarket kiosks that supply the latest Hollywood drek, I am worried at my ability to rent movies that I can't imagine anyone else is watching. 

     As David Bowie's alien character profoundly summed it up in 'The Man Who Fell to Earth': "television shows us everything, but it doesn't tell us anything".  Now of course we would have to replace 'television' with Facebook and Twitter.

    On the popular culture side of things, horrible acting performances in movies that should have been buried long ago can humanize our reactions to an actor.  Conversely, we can also see early movies that showed such promise for an actor who later left the acting ship at the dock to board the zombie express (earth calling Nicholas Cage).  My point here is time travel via cinema is a wonderful and perhaps overwhelming thing.  I know the more films I see in other time periods, the more I long for a different mode of dress than the one the new Topshop offers.  Why can't we all live in the fashion sense of Le Mepris?

      Just the ability to watch films on demand has somewhat altered the way we perceive the world.  When I was a young child the Wizard of Oz was on TV just once a year and it was an occasion!  Like nature delivering a strawberry bounty in June, it was a special event that was to be anticipated, savored, and then in a blink it was gone.  Now, of course, a child could own "The Wizard of Oz" and watch it every afternoon.  Perhaps that would have helped to de-sensitize me to the scary talking trees scene...

    I am carrying on here and perhaps confusing limitless access to the canon of film with self absorbed humans on cell phones who wander the sidewalk at a snail's pace....ooops.  But it is all related, don't you think?  I emerged from an afternoon showing of a Melville film at Film Forum last week and felt somewhat like a mole when the sun hit me.  I wonder if the limitless information of our digital age contributes to isolated pockets of self minded people and cuts off public community.  Do we sit in the dark, so to speak and blink irritatedly when the sun shines our way?

Written by DJ Trouble

April 28th, 2009 at 8:10 am

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